Klenk Law

Tag: Atlantic County

Do I Pay Probate Fees on Real Property Located Outside Pennsylvania?

Posted on Wed Sep 7, 2016, on Probate and Estate Administration

From Our “Ask a Question” mailbag:” Do I pay probate fees on real property located outside of Pennsylvania? Do I even list it on the Register of Wills’ Inventory? I am the executor of my mother’s estate in Philadelphia. She died owning a New Jersey shore home. Do I list this on the Philadelphia Register of Wills’ Inventory and then pay a probate fee?

How to defend my use of Power of Attorney in Atlantic County, New Jersey?

Posted on Wed Oct 21, 2015, on Power of Attorney

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My brother named me his agent under his Atlantic County, New Jersey power of attorney. Now my sister claims I embezzled and stole money using that power of attorney. How do I clear my name?

As agent, you are permitted to retain an Atlantic County Surrogates Court Attorney to assist you in filing a Formal Accounting of all your actions as Agent. This accounting is then provided to all interested parties, who are free to either accept the terms or object. If they file objections, you are then able to address these objections in front of a judge. In the end, the judge then rules on the evidence presented.

How do I protect my dad from criminal telemarketers?

Posted on Tue Oct 20, 2015, on Elder Financial Scams

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My father has reached the age where he has become trusting to a fault. He was called by an unscrupulous telemarketer and fleeced out of several thousand dollars. I am worried that his number will now be passed around to other criminals and he will write more checks. How do I protect my dad from criminal telemarketers?

Your suspicions are right—once your dad’s recognized as a potential “mark” among the criminal community, he could become a target for scammers who pretend to be calling him on your behalf, asking for payments toward funeral expenses, emergency medical bills, or sweepstakes prize processing fees. According to the FBI, your father likely shares traits that were common among his generation — raised to be polite and trusting, and often reluctant to hang up the phone even if they suspect a scam.

Which kind of trust is the best to avoid probate?

Posted on Sun Oct 18, 2015, on Estate Planning

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: There seem to be many different types of trusts. Which one is the best to avoid probate?

Trusts are very flexible estate planning tools. They can be used to avoid creditors, shelter assets from divorce, reduce taxes, and to avoid probate. To avoid probate in New Jersey, you could use a Revocable Living Trust or you could use any number of different Irrevocable Trusts.

Do I need a doctor’s note to use my Dad’s Power of Attorney in New Jersey?

Posted on Thu Aug 6, 2015, on Power of Attorney

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My father, who lives in Atlantic County, New Jersey, is having serious health problems. He wants me to be able to use his general power of attorney, but it says I need a doctor’s note saying that he is incapacitated. Is that normal?

Your father has a “Leaping” Power of Attorney, which used to be the normal document that Atlantic County Estate Planning Lawyers would prepare. A Leaping Power of Attorney only gives the “Agent” the power to act if—and only if—the principal is incapacitated, and the principal’s doctor confirms the incapacity in a letter. Without the letter the power of attorney is useless.

Can I be sworn in as Personal Representative outside New Jersey?

Posted on Thu Jul 30, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My father died a resident of New Jersey, but I live in Florida and have trouble traveling. Can I be sworn in as Personal Representative outside New Jersey?

It is possible to make arrangements for you to be sworn in as a New Jersey Personal Representative by the Surrogate of your county in Florida. This takes a bit more time and expense, but is cheaper than flying back and forth to New Jersey.

Do my husband’s children inherit my husband’s half of the house?

Posted on Wed Jul 15, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My husband died a resident of New Jersey and we owned a house together in Atlantic County which is in both of our names. He has two children from a prior marriage. Do his children get any ownership in the house?

The answer will depend on how you both owned the house together. You wrote that you owned your house “in both names,” which could mean you owned the house in any of three different ways.

Do I have to pay estate creditors in Atlantic County, New Jersey if no estate is opened or will filed?

Posted on Fri Jul 10, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My husband died a resident of Atlantic County without a will. All his assets were owned joint accounts with me. This week, I received a form letter in the mail saying they had issued a statement and a proof of claim against my husband’s estate. They’re also requesting immediate payment in full. The letter is addressed to his estate, but came in the mail to me. What should I do?

When someone dies without a will and all their assets are held jointly with a spouse, there is no need to file a will as the assets pass to the surviving spouse because of joint ownership. That being said, avoiding probate by using a joint ownership does not mean that he avoided his creditors.

How can I sell a parent’s house after death in Atlantic County?

Posted on Wed Jun 17, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My mother passed away in Atlantic County, New Jersey. She was divorced, with four children, leaving no will. She only owned a house, but it has a mortgage taken out by her boyfriend. How do we sell the house?

When a person dies as a resident of New Jersey without a will, they die “intestate.” New Jersey has a set of rules that dictate who has the right to petition the Atlantic County Surrogate to be named the Administrator of an intestate estate. In your case, all four children have this right.

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