Klenk Law

Tag: Gloucester County

My Sister Died Without a Will. Does My Half-Sister Get a Share?

Posted on Wed Nov 9, 2016, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses what happens when a sibling dies without a Will in New Jersey.

“My sister died in New Jersey without a will. Our parents are dead, and she never married or had children. Our dad had a daughter out of wedlock when he was very young. It was something that the family didn’t speak of, and we only saw her once in our lives. If a sibling dies without a Will in New Jersey, does a half-sibling receive a share?”

Getting divorced? Three Estate Planning Documents to Immediately Change.

Posted on Thu Mar 10, 2016, on Estate Planning

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses the issue of which documents to change when divorcing.: “My Wife is divorcing me, what estate planning documents should I change to protect myself?”

“I am not sure which documents to change when divorcing. My Wife has filed for divorce, what estate planning documents should I change to protect myself?”

Can an Estate Pay for Care a Child Provided to a Parent?

Posted on Sun Feb 7, 2016, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: Before he died, my dad lived with me in Gloucester County, New Jersey for several years. My wife and I took him to the doctor and cared for him when he became bedridden. He died without a will and all his assets are being divided between my brothers and I equally. They never helped with his care. This is not fair. Can I make the estate pay me for my time?

Gloucester County Landlord Creditor of Estate

Posted on Mon Oct 5, 2015, on Estate Litigation

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My Dad passed away this month. When he died, I found out that I was still on his Gloucester County lease as a cosigner. The lease was signed in 2011. I had moved out in 2013, letting the management company know that I wanted off the lease. When I asked if the management company had anything for me to sign, they replied ‘no’. When I moved out, my Dad had let his brother, his brother’s son, and his brother’s grandson move in. They are still there and the landlord knows of the situation, asking them for money for every day they have been there past May. At best, when my Dad died I thought I would be morally obligated to remove my Dad’s property and clean. Instead, the feeling I am getting is that the landlord wants to hold me responsible for damages, utilities, and possible future rent. Dad had nothing and I am a stay-at-home mom of special needs children.

You have mentioned a number of potential issues. First, the only person who has the authority to act for your dad after he has died is the Personal Representative of his estate (if he had a Will) or the Administrator of his estate (if he had no Will). It sounds like your dad (or his estate) owes the landlord some money.

Do I have to move my Gloucester County house into my Revocable Living Trust?

Posted on Wed Sep 9, 2015, on Revocable Trusts and Living Trusts

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I had a Revocable Living Trust created several years ago, but I have not put anything into it. I own my Philadelphia home, a few bank accounts and investment accounts. I want everything to pass to my daughter at my death, but she lives in California, so I want the transfer to be easy. Should I move my house from my name into the Revocable Trust?

The goal you have stated in forming your Revocable Living Trust was to make things easier on your daughter who lives in California. Though your intentions are good, without moving the house into the trust you really have done nothing to help her.

The basic idea surrounding a Revocable Living Trust is that during your lifetime you either move your assets into the trust or you set things up so that at your death, they pour into the trust.

What is a Spendthrift Trust in Gloucester County, New Jersey?

Posted on Mon Sep 7, 2015, on Trusts

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I was told that I should make the Irrevocable Trusts I am setting up for my children “Spendthrift” Trusts. What does that mean, and what is the advantage of a Spendthrift Trust?

A Spendthrift Trust refers to an Irrevocable Trust created for a beneficiary that does not give the beneficiary the right to assign his or her interest in the trust to a third person, so that the trust assets are not subject to the beneficiary’s liabilities or creditor claims.

Can I change my Uncle’s Gloucester County Will with his consent?

Posted on Mon Sep 7, 2015, on Estate Planning

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I am the executor under my Uncle’s will (he is alive and living in Gloucester County). I would like to make a minor change to his will. My uncle agrees to the change. Do I need a lawyer to change the will?

Each competent person over the age of 18 can have a will, but only that person can change or modify the will. Your uncle is free to change the Will if he is still competent. The Executor is the person who carries out the terms of the Will after death, so right now you have no power to do anything, especially make changes.

Do I have to pay estate creditors in Gloucester County if no estate is opened?

Posted on Fri Aug 7, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My husband died a resident of Gloucester County without a will. All his assets were owned jointly with me. This week, I received a form letter in the mail from a creditor saying they had issued a statement and proof of claim against my husband’s estate. Also, they requested immediate payment in full. It is addressed to his estate, but came in the mail to me. What should I do?

When someone dies without a will and all their assets are held jointly with a spouse, there is no need to file a will as the assets pass to the surviving spouse because of the joint ownership. That being said, avoiding probate by using a joint ownership does not mean that he avoided his creditors.

Should I appoint my two kids as co-executors in Gloucester County, NJ?

Posted on Thu Jul 30, 2015, on Estate Planning

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I am a resident of Gloucester County, New Jersey and want to modify my will. My two children are older and I want to name them as co-executors. Is naming my children as co-executors a good idea?

Naming your children as co-executors (or “personal representatives”) of your will can be a fine idea, or a terrible idea, depending on your children. You need to be honest with yourself about how well your children’s personalities work (or do not work) together.

Do I need a doctor’s note to use my Mom’s Power of Attorney in Gloucester County, New Jersey?

Posted on Fri Jul 17, 2015, on Power of Attorney

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My mother, who lives in Gloucester County, New Jersey, is having serious health problems. She wants me to be able to use her general power of attorney, but it says I need a doctor’s note saying that she is incapacitated. Is that normal?

Your mother has a “Leaping” Power of Attorney, which at one time was the normal document that Gloucester County estate planning lawyers would prepare. A Leaping Power of Attorney gives the “Agent” the power to act for the person if-and only if-that person has become incapacitated and the Agent can secure a letter from the person’s doctor certifying that face. Without the doctor’s letter, the power of attorney is useless.

Page 1 of 3123

Let us put our expertise to work for you.

Free consultation within 24 hours.