Klenk Law

Tag: Gift Tax

Don’t forget the Tried-And-True Gifting Strategies in 2012

Posted on Thu Sep 20, 2012, on Estate Planning

Rightfully so, much emphasis is being put on utilizing Gift Giving strategies that are scheduled to disappear on January 1, 2013. But when considering these strategies, don’t forget gift strategies that have worked in the past and continue to be cornerstones of most estate plans.

Take Advantage of The Annual Gift Exemption: When congress created the Gift Tax to plug loopholes that existed in the Federal Estate Tax, they created several categories of gifts that were considered “good gifts”, not subject to the gift tax. One of these exemptions is an annual gift to any number of persons. That rate is now adjusted for inflation, and for 2013 is a maximum of $13,000. Couples can lend each other the exemption so together can give $26,000 to any number of individuals. These gifts are then excluded from the estate and pass Gift and Estate Tax free to the recipient.¹

Estate Planning Opportunities; Use Them or Lose Them!

Posted on Mon Sep 17, 2012, on Estate Planning

Only a little over three months remain to maximize estate tax and gift tax opportunities that are scheduled to disappear in 2013. There is still time, but if you are going to act you need to start working with your estate planning lawyer soon.

Never have the Gift Tax and Estate Tax exemptions been higher than they are currently. The Federal Estate and Gift Tax Exemptions are currently $5,120,000.00. If congress takes no actions, these exemptions fall to $1,000,000.00 in 2013. This change exposes to taxation an additional $4,120,000 to those who die or gift in 2013 vs. 2012, increasing the tax due by hundreds if not millions of dollars.¹

What Are the Tax Advantages of Revocable Trusts?

Posted on Mon Aug 20, 2012, on Revocable Trusts and Living Trusts

A revocable trust, or its more popular name a “Living Trust”, is an increasingly popular estate planning tool. The Living Trust serves many useful purposes, but many people are told that one purpose is to reduce taxes. This is not true. A Revocable Trust does not reduce income taxes, estate taxes, gift taxes, generation skipping taxes or inheritance taxes. In short, there is no tax advantage gained by a Living Trust. If someone is trying to sell you on the idea of forming a Revocable Trust based on tax savings, run away!

Some trusts do create various tax benefits. So why does a Living Trust provide no tax benefit?

Let us put our expertise to work for you.

Free consultation within 24 hours.