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Tag: Intestate Succession

My Sister Died Without a Will. Does My Half-Sister Get a Share?

Posted on Wed Nov 9, 2016, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses what happens when a sibling dies without a Will in New Jersey.

“My sister died in New Jersey without a will. Our parents are dead, and she never married or had children. Our dad had a daughter out of wedlock when he was very young. It was something that the family didn’t speak of, and we only saw her once in our lives. If a sibling dies without a Will in New Jersey, does a half-sibling receive a share?”

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Do my stepchildren inherit any of my wife’s assets in Philadelphia?

Posted on Fri Aug 21, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My wife passed recently. We own a house together in Philadelphia in both names. She died with no other assets aside from our joint checking account. We have three children from our marriage and she has three children from her prior marriage. Does her half of the house go to my stepchildren?

First, Pennsylvania has no requirement that you leave your children any portion of your estate. So if your wife had a will, she could leave her entire estate to you and the children would have no claim. Assets can also be left at death by contract.

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What happens if I die without a will after a second marriage in Pennsylvania?

Posted on Mon Aug 10, 2015, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I am married to my second wife and live in Chester County, Pennsylvania. We have been married for many years and everything we own is in joint names. I don’t have a will. If I die first, don’t my children from my first marriage get part of my estate?

If everything you own is held jointly with your wife and she survives you, then she has the right to take all of your assets. Your children will get nothing. Your second wife has no obligation to give your children anything, so she could disinherit them at her death.

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Camden County Intestacy Rules – The State of NJ Decides Who Gets Your Stuff

Posted on Mon Jun 15, 2015, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: Before he died, my dad lived with me in Camden County, New Jersey for several years. My wife and I took him to the doctor and cared for him when he became bedridden. He died without a will and all his assets are being divided between my brothers and I equally. They never helped with his care. This is not fair. Can I make the estate pay me for my time?

Under New Jersey rules, your father could have made a will and given you the entire estate. Alternately, he could have made a Will that said you would receive more of his estate to reflect the work you did. Because he did not make a Will at all, the New Jersey intestate rule divides his assets between all children, equally.

Klenk Law

Dying Without a Will in New Jersey with Stepchildren

Posted on Wed Nov 12, 2014, on Estate Planning

If you die without a will in New Jersey you are said to die “intestate”. If you die intestate, your probate assets are divided up under the New Jersey Intestate Rules. These rules can easily be avoided by writing a will, but if you do not have a will, the Intestacy Rules are in place to clearly state who inherits your probate property in order to avoid conflict.

Klenk Law

Dying Without a Will – Intestacy Succession for Foster Kids

Posted on Fri Nov 7, 2014, on Estate Planning

If you die without a will in New Jersey you are said to die “intestate”. If you die intestate, your probate assets are divided up under the New Jersey Intestate Rules. These rules can easily be avoided by writing a will, but if you do not have a will, the Intestacy Rules are in place to clearly state who inherits your probate property in order to avoid conflict.

Klenk Law

Dying Without a Will – Foster Child Succession in Delaware County

Posted on Mon Nov 3, 2014, on Estate Planning

If you die without a will in Pennsylvania you are said to die “intestate”. If you die intestate, your probate assets are divided up under the Pennsylvania Intestate Rules. These rules can easily be avoided by writing a will, but if you do not have a will, the Intestacy Rules are in place to clearly state who inherits your probate property in order to avoid conflict.

Klenk Law

Dying Without a Will in Chester County, PA, and how it effects stepchildren

Posted on Mon Oct 27, 2014, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

If you die without a will in Pennsylvania you are said to die “intestate”. If you die intestate, your probate assets are divided up under the Pennsylvania Intestate Rules. These rules can easily be avoided by writing a will, but if you do not have a will, the Intestacy Rules are in place to clearly state who inherits your probate property in order to avoid conflict.

Klenk Law

What Happens if I die Without a Will in Camden County, New Jersey?

Posted on Sat May 17, 2014, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

If you die in Camden County, New Jersey without a will, you are said to die “intestate”. Each state has developed its own rules about how the assets of intestate estates are divided among the living. These rules vary from state to state, but in general, your assets will be divided between your spouse and children. How your estate is divided between your spouse and child depends on your state of residence at the time of your death.

Klenk Law

Dying Without a Will in New Jersey

Posted on Mon Aug 6, 2012, on Intestacy, Dying Without a Will

Many New Jersey residents will die without a Will. Many will die unexpectedly before they can prepare a Will, but most people simply just don’t get around to writing a Will. If you die without a Will in New Jersey, you are said to die “Intestate”, or without testamentary documents. It is not true that if you die without a Will in New Jersey that your assets pass to the state. Instead, a set of rules decide who is in charge of your estate and to whom your assets pass.

Surrogate’s Court: If a New Jersey relative of yours dies without a Will (“Intestate”), and you wish to represent that person’s estate, you must get permission though the Surrogate’s Court. Each county has a Surrogate’s Court, so the first step is to determine which Surrogate’s Court has jurisdiction over the estate. For example, if the deceased was a resident of Camden County but died in a Berks County hospital, it is the Camden County Surrogate’s Court that has jurisdiction over the case. At times a person becomes ill and moves just prior to death. For example, if a person lived her entire life in Gloucester County, but became ill and moved to her daughter’s house in Atlantic County two months before she died and she would have never moved but for the illness, the Gloucester County Surrogate’s Court has jurisdiction over the estate.

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What Our clients are saying

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Maxine G.

Peter Klenk made a complex subject understandable and allowed us to move forward with our estate planning. He was patient with our questions and creative in the solutions he proposed.

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Chris B.

AWESOME LAWYER! Peter Klenk is an exceptional attorney and a very nice person! Today I spoke with Peter about estate planning and was impressed with by his professionalism, cordiality, and attention to detail. I highly recommend Klenk Law for probates, wills, trusts, and other issues germane to estate planning!

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Christopher F.

Peter explained things in a way that was easy to understand. Everything was done in the time frame he said it. Could not have been better!

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Klenk Law is an exceptional practice. Their fine lawyers and staff team up to produce excellent results for their clients. They excel at explaining the often cryptic laws and policies that govern estate planning right down to the complexities of the various "trust" frameworks. Peter himself manages each client together with his great team, and he has a rare quality to be both a walking encyclopedia of planning minutia and also one of the most likable lawyers I have ever had the pleasure of dealing with. He is truly generous in intellect and in his personal approach to getting the "big picture" for complex family structures. I trust him implicitly to help me make the right choices for the future. In short, Klenk Law is a gem of a firm.

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Peter J. Gutekunst, CFP®

I've worked with and known Peter Klenk and his associates for years. They are highly professional, diligent and truly experts in their field. By focusing on just wills, trusts, and estates, Klenk law has experienced every angle of estate planning and applied that knowledge to help prepare our clients with thorough and comprehensive documents.

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