Klenk Law

Tag: Medical Power of Attorney

Estate-Planning-LGBT-Married-Couples

Estate Planning for LGBT Married Couples

Posted on Tue Nov 29, 2016, on LGBT Estate Planning

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses Estate Planning for LGBT Married Couples.

“Right after the legalization of gay marriage my husband and I married in Pennsylvania. Since then, we have not updated any documents. Given the outcome of the Presidential election, we feel like we need to get things done. What is Estate Planning for LGBT Married Couples?”

Estate-Planning-for-LGBT-Couples

LGBT Estate Planning After Trump

Posted on Sat Nov 12, 2016, on LGBT Estate Planning

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses LGBT Estate Planning for Married Couples after President Trump’s election.

My wife and I are a same-sex married couple. We married in New Jersey and now live in Pennsylvania. Trump’s election makes us nervous, we are afraid that he may strip away some of our married couple rights. What estate planning documents should we sign to make sure that we have the right to make medical decisions for each other should one of us get sick?”

Getting divorced? Three Estate Planning Documents to Immediately Change.

Posted on Thu Mar 10, 2016, on Estate Planning

Our “Ask a Question” mailbag addresses the issue of which documents to change when divorcing.: “My Wife is divorcing me, what estate planning documents should I change to protect myself?”

“I am not sure which documents to change when divorcing. My Wife has filed for divorce, what estate planning documents should I change to protect myself?”

How do I manage medical decisions for my son if he is in another state?

Posted on Thu Oct 29, 2015, on Medical Power of Attorney Living Will

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My son does not get along with his stepfather and wants to move to another state to live with relatives. He won’t turn 18 for another year. How do I manage medical decisions for him if he is in another state?

For non-emergency medical care, there is likely no problem as you can communicate with his local doctor and give authorization for examinations or minor care. Work with his doctor and give their office the authorization that they request.

Do I need a doctor’s note to use my Mom’s Power of Attorney in New Jersey?

Posted on Thu Jun 4, 2015, on Power of Attorney

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: My mother, who lives in Burlington County, New Jersey, is having serious health problems. She wants me to be able to use her general power of attorney, but it says I need a doctor’s note saying that she is incapacitated. Is that normal?

Your mother has a “Leaping” Power of Attorney, which at one time was the normal document that Burlington County Estate Planning Lawyers would prepare. A Leaping Power of Attorney gives the “Agent” the power to act for the person if—and only if—that person has become incapacitated, and the Agent can secure a letter from the person’s doctor stating that the person is incapacitated. Without the letter the power of attorney is useless.

Do I need a doctor’s note to use my Mom’s Power of Attorney in Camden County, New Jersey?

Posted on Thu Apr 9, 2015, on Power of Attorney

My mother, who lives in Camden County, New Jersey, is having serious health problems. She wants me to be able to use her general power of attorney, but it requires a doctor’s note saying that she is incapacitated. Is that normal?

Your mother has a “Leaping” Power of Attorney which, at one time, was the normal document that Camden County Estate Planning Lawyers would prepare. A Leaping Power of Attorney gives the “Agent” the power to act for the person if…and only if…that person has become incapacitated, and the Agent can secure a letter from the person’s doctor stating that the person is incapacitated. Without the letter, the power of attorney is useless.

Leaping Power of Attorney Issues in Camden County, NJ

Posted on Sat Mar 21, 2015, on Power of Attorney

My mother, who lives in Camden County, New Jersey, is having serious health problems. She wants me to be able to use her general power of attorney, but it says I need a doctor’s note saying that she is incapacitated. Is that normal?

Your mother has a “Leaping” Power of Attorney, which, at one time, was the normal document that Camden County Estate Planning Lawyers would prepare. A Leaping Power of Attorney gives the “Agent” the power to act for the person if — and only if — that person has become incapacitated, and the Agent can secure a letter from the person’s doctor stating that the person is incapacitated.

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