Klenk Law

Tag: Elder Care

How do I get reimbursed for care I provided my mother while she lived with me?

Posted on Tue Aug 18, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: Before she died, my mother lived in my Philadelphia home and required around-the-clock care, which I provided. My brother and sister did not even visit. Now that she has died, her estate is being divided up between us and my siblings refuse to compensate me for all the work I did caring for our mom. Can I make a claim to be paid?

Your mother’s estate is to be divided up between the heirs as her will dictates, or through the rules of intestacy if she had no will. Prior to the division of the assets, all creditors will be paid. If you have no agreement showing that you were doing the work for a fee, it will be difficult to prove that you are a creditor.

Elder Financial Scam Allegedly Left No Estate Money, Philadelphia

Posted on Wed Jul 29, 2015, on Elder Financial Scams

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: When my father became very ill two years ago, we hired a full time caretaker to help him. We live in California and my father lived in Philadelphia, so we could not be there at all times. At his death, we were shocked to find out that his will was changed and the caretaker was the executor. She says all his money was spent on medical care, but that is impossible. We are now being told we are the heirs, but there is no money. I suspect she has stolen his money. What can I do?

You have a few options. If the will has been filed and accepted by the Register, you could appeal the validity of the will to the Philadelphia Orphans’ Court.

Do I need long term care insurance in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania?

Posted on Mon Jul 27, 2015, on Estate Planning

Like all insurance, if you end up needing long term care insurance, it can be a great deal. But, if you don’t use it, then you could argue that you wasted your premium payments. In reality, you buy insurance to cover the “what if” situations in life.

I have had plenty of clients that paid for long term health care Insurance that died without using their policy benefits. However, I have also had several clients who fell ill and were able to stay in their homes with in-house care only because of the funds paid out from a long term health care policy.

Caregiver Reimbursement From Bucks County Decedent Estate

Posted on Mon Jul 27, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: Before she died, my mother-in-law lived in my Bucks County, Pennsylvania house and required round-the-clock care, which I provided. My husband’s brother and sister did not even visit. Now that she has died, her estate is being divided up between the children. They refuse to compensate me for all the work I did caring for their mother. Can I make a claim to be paid?

Your mother-in-law’s estate is to be divided up between the heirs as her will dictates, or through the rules of intestacy if she had no will. Prior to the division of the assets, all creditors must be paid.

Montgomery County Reimbursement Options for Relative Care

Posted on Wed Jul 8, 2015, on Probate and Estate Administration

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: Before she died, my mother-in-law lived in my Montgomery County, Pennsylvania house and required around-the-clock care, which I provided. My husband’s brother and sister did not even visit. Now that she has died, her estate is being divided up between the children and they refuse to compensate me for all the work I did caring for their mother. Can I make a claim to be paid?

Your mother-in-law’s estate is to be divided up between the heirs as her will dictates, or through the rules of intestacy if she had no will. Prior to the division of the assets, all creditors must be paid.

Is Long Term Care Insurance a necessity?

Posted on Tue Jun 30, 2015, on Estate Planning

Our Ask a Question mailbag often includes reader submissions wondering about whether long term care insurance makes financial sense.

As with all insurance policies, long term care coverage works out to be a great deal — if you actually use it. On the other hand, you could argue that you wasted money if you never have to claim your benefits.

Over the years I have had many Gloucester County clients who died without using their long term care insurance benefits. But there have also been clients who fell ill and, without strong policies in place, would have been forced to leave their homes.

Atlantic County Long Term Care Option – What You Need To Know

Posted on Tue Jun 9, 2015, on Estate Planning

Many readers have submitted questions recently about long term care insurance, especially from Atlantic County, New Jersey. Despite all the attention that Atlantic City gets in the news, Atlantic County’s core population mostly lives inland—with over 43,000 residents in Egg Harbor Township alone.

That population’s getting older all the time, too. Compare the 2010 Census results with its predecessor and you’ll see that, as in many parts of the country, citizens aged 65 and older make up a growing percentage of the population.

Is Long Term Care Insurance a good idea for LGBT couples?

Posted on Wed May 20, 2015, on LGBT Estate Planning

From our “Ask a Question” mailbag: I am in a long-term, same-sex relationship with my partner. She happens to be much older than I, and I am concerned about the expenses of caring for her as she gets older. Would Long Term Care Insurance be a good option?

I have had clients use Long Term Health Insurance as a useful tool in their estate plan. Clients typically get the best use from this tool when they thoughtfully look ahead to the potential expenses of old age and work closely with their financial advisors. Specifically, I ask clients to examine whether their savings for retirement are adequate to address the costs of an unexpected, serious health problem.

Elder Care, Elder Abuse, and the Constitution.

Posted on Mon Jun 17, 2013, on Elder Financial Scams

As the “Boomer Generation” ages, the United States’ elderly population has become the most rapidly growing segment of our population. In 2010, the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) reported that the population of people age 65 and older in the United States had reached 40.3 million, or 13% of the total population. This number will only continue to rise and the NCEA has projected that by 2050, this population will grow to 20%.

As the elderly population continues to increase, the concerns for interest and asset protection have increased as well. According to the Elder Law Advisory, 48% of nursing home residents have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and the NCEA reports that approximately 5.1 million American elders have some type of dementia. Because their conditions can leave them with symptoms of confusion, they become more susceptible to manipulation and can be more vulnerable to abuse, exploitation and neglect. Unfortunately, approximately 90% of these abusers are family members.

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